[Reading] ➾ Die Wand ➵ Marlen Haushofer – Survivingtheholocaust.us

Die WandEine Frau Will Mit Ihrer Kusine Und Deren Mann Ein Paar Tage In Einem Jagdhaus In Den Bergen Verbringen Nach Der Ankunft Unternimmt Das Paar Noch Einen Gang Ins N Chste Dorf Und Kehrt Nicht Mehr Zur Ck Am N Chsten Morgen St T Die Frau Auf Eine Un Berwindbare Wand, Hinter Der Totenstarre Herrscht Abgeschlossen Von Der Brigen Welt, Richtet Sie Sich Inmittten Ihres Engumgrenzten St Cks Natur Und Umgeben Von Einigen Zugelaufenen Tieren Aufs Berleben Ein.

    10 thoughts on “[Reading] ➾ Die Wand ➵ Marlen Haushofer – Survivingtheholocaust.us


  1. says:

    I can allow myself to write the truth all the people for whom I have lied throughout my life are dead.An unnamed woman arrives with her cousin and her husband to their alpine hunting lodge Their staying is planned for a weekend The same evening the couple go to the nearby village and when they don t return the next day our heroine sets off to meet them halfway to unexpectedly come across the impenetrable barrier A wall A transparent yet impassable wall through it she can see households in the valley and its, now frozen in time, inhabitants Petrified in their last action farmer, woman sitting on the bench, a cow lying on the meadow Everything equally calm and apparently not alive Dead, but hard to know of what disease or hostile deed.It all seems like a bad joke but there s no explanation to what happened Our heroine having not much choice needs to cope with unusual situation And the novel is a meticulous, detailed report of her actions And there s something strangely calming and quieting in these simple deeds, in growing potates and bean, in logging wood, cutt...


  2. says:

    A female Robinson Crusoe finds herself as a castaway in a lonely dystopian forest, and an invisible wall blocks her from the rest of humanity, which has mysteriously turned into stone sculptures, an absurd reversed Pygmalion creation act Well, that could be a great detective story, or an alien monster action thriller But as apocalypses go, this one is very quiet and factual, and it doesn t offer any explanation for the situation the woman finds herself in Not even a hint What we do get, in brilliant prose, is a narrative of survival and solitude, of strength and weakness, of humanity defined by its basic logical and practical skills and by empathy for living things While the woman calculates her needs and reinvents agriculture for herself, she also domesticates animals and mourns their loss when they die She struggles and enjoys her life, and when danger lurks, it is bizarrely from the single other human being that resides i...


  3. says:

    I discovered Marlen Haushofer s The Wall through a friend s review of the film version of the book It looked like a dystopian novel and I also suspected that Stephen King s Under the Dome was inspired by Haushofer s book in some ways Something about the book tugged at my heart, and I couldn t articulate it then So, I went and got the book and started reading it last week I finished reading it yesterday Here is what I think.The story told in The Wall is simple The nameless heroine, a forty something year old woman, goes on a holiday to the forest with her cousin and her cousin s husband They stay in a hunting lodge The plan is to spend a few days there and relax and maybe do some hunting The cousin and her husband leave our heroine during the evening and go to the nearby village They leave their dog Lynx behind It is late evening and the couple still haven t come back Our heroine has dinner, feeds the dog and goes to bed When she gets up the next day morning, there is still no sign of her cousin and her husband Our heroine and Lynx take a walk and during the course of that, she discovers that there is a transparent wall which has suddenly come up and it has shut her off from the village and from the rest of the world I don t know whether it ...


  4. says:

    Book2moviechallenge 201212 12 Ein Film der 2012 aus einer Literaturvorlage ver ffentlicht wird Buch 5 Sterne Eines jener B cher, das mich beim erstmaligen Lesen vor mehr als 10 Jahren am meisten beeindruckt und gleichzeitig extrem verst rt hat Die Hauptdarstellerin ist zu Gast auf Sommerfrische bei Freunden in einer einsamen Jagdh tte, wacht am Morgen auf und muss feststellen, dass sie in einer relativ weitl ufigen gl sernen Kuppel gefangen ist Ihre Gastgeber wollten am Vortag kurz ins Dorf gehen und sind nicht mehr zur ckgekommen Langsam findet sie heraus, dass hinter der Wand alle tot sind Es ist furchtbar sich auszumalen, was passiert wenn man der letzte Mensch auf der Erde ist und sich voll mit dem berlebenskampf besch ftigen muss Atmosph risch sehr dicht und in wunderbarer Sprache wird die Freude an der Natur, die Einsamkeit, die Furcht, die Entbehrung, die harte Arbeit und die Ann herung an die Tiere, die ihr geblieben sind, geschildert Auch das berraschende Finale l t sehr viel Raum f r Spekulationen, ber das Warum und Was W re Wenn Grandios mehr kann ich aber nicht verraten, ohne Spoileralarm auszul sen Fazit Sprachlich und inhaltlich ist das Buch ein Hit Film 5 Sterne Der Film ist wirklich die perfekte optische Umsetzung eines an sich schon fabelhaften Werkes und setzt mit seinen beein...


  5. says:

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  6. says:

    a marvelous book It is beyond me why this novel is classified a feminist classic as it holds up as something great no matter whose sex wrote it This is a story of redemption under grave circumstances It is a tale of determination and persistence in the face of uncertain and daunting circumstances The novel could be deemed an instruction manual on how to live a life with one s own self, alone and entrusted with responsibilities perhaps too great for the typical human being handed them But the narrator prevails and actually thrives in her seclusion, and is given the opportunity for true self esteem and meaning in her life And that is not a feminist theme but rather something universal to be strived for no matter what sex one is, or even regarding our present day, working out perhaps what sex one isn t Marlen Haushofer writes in an engaging style, conversing with the reader as if on solid ground and friendly terms, tolerant at all times for the fate she has been faced with, and in my eyes kindly hoping that we might do the same, given similar circumstances Through her lot of characters she inherits all domesticated animals , Haushofer develops their personalities emotionally and spiritually to the degree...


  7. says:

    My animals were fond of my familiar smell, my voice and my movements I could easily cast off my face it was needed no longer At this thought a feeling of emptiness rose up in me, which I had to get rid of at any price I looked for some kind of work to do, and told myself that in my situation it was childish to mourn a face, but the tormenting sense that I had lost something important would not be driven away. Virginia Woolf once called Middlemarch one of the few novels that had been written for grownups, or something along those lines I follow suit with this work, which in the realm of sci fi does not badger with a multiplicity of facts, in the realm of psychological novels does not bloat itself on tropes outside the white male mainstay, in the realm of the pastoral does not encourage and in the realm of pioneering does not present violence as the only way Emotion is far concerned with internal erasure than external pride and prejudice, and the foraging homicide, the one man survival kit, the hero, all of them were caught on the wrong side of the wall I m still afraid, because I know that I can live only if I fa...


  8. says:

    I stood up three times and convinced myself that here, three yards from me, there really was something invisible, smooth and cool blocking my path I thought it might be a hallucination, but of course I knew that it was nothing of the kind I could have coped much easily with a momentary insanity than with this terrible, invisible thing But there was Lynx with his bleeding mouth, and there was the bump on my head, which was beginning to ache.When our narrator was invited by her cousin Luise and Hugo to go and stay at their hunting lodge in the foothills of the Alps for a few days, she was very keen on the idea She was a window with grown up children and could think of nothing enjoyable than a sojourn in the mountains But when her hosts went off to the local village and did not return the following morning, our narrator set out to find them She took the family dog Lynx with her, who was the first to come across, and was immediately frustrated by what appeared to be an invisible wall, blocking their progress.So in reality this doesn t appear to be the start to a rather excellent story and there you would be wrong Put yourself in her position You re all alone You can look through this invisible wall and see the people in the valley in their various frozen positions as well as their animals What could have happened to them She often thought about it but could come up with no definitive re...


  9. says:

    How did I not find this book when I was writing Our Endless Numbered Days I d not even heard of it until recently It is wonderful An unexplained and invisible wall comes down trapping the narrator in section of the Austrian Alps with only a dog and some basic provisions She has decided to write a report of what happened, and so in looking back we get tiny snippets of what has happened in her present, just enough to tease us and keep us wondering The report, and nearly all of the book is a daily account of the activities she has to do to stay alive But it is also so much than this It is not the food that keeps her alive, but her relationship with various animals, which in the end come to mean so much to her than any human relationship she had, probably even her own children My only issue with the novel and you can see I overcame it, since I gave it five stars is that when she first disovers the wall she doesn t follow it to the very end, so it is possible at that s...


  10. says:

    The Wall is a wonderful novel It is not often that you can say only a woman could have written this book, but women in particular will understand the heroine s loving devotion to the details of making and keeping life, every day felt as a victory against everything that would like to undermine and destroy It is as absorbing as Robinson Crusoe Doris Lessing External freedom has probably never existed, but neither have I ever known anyone who knew inner freedom Marlen HaushofferI have watched the movie, with the same title, by Julian P lsler A long, deeply felt meditation on loneliness, survival, friendship with animals, since she s all alone, inside a mysterious, invisible wall, deemed to be three meters thick, which separates her from the rest of the world Up there, among the mountains and forests, a woman has got a cottage to live in, a cow to take care of and dear dog and a cat, to start with For two years, starting on a 5th of November and ending on a 25th of February, she ll try to accurately record, on the available paper, her inward musings on fear, hope, on being a human and not getting into despair rather, at all costs, survive the ravages of the weather, loneliness and loss.Her writings, though, include blessed summer moments in the wild, using her binoculars for gazing at the stars Fear, though, erupts often.Out of the harshness a new self has emerged She ll have to use a gun, kill a man, hunt deer, do her crops, plant ...

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